Under Tile Roofing

Tile roofing that uses battens or has a naturally occurring air space because of the shape of the tile makes adding a radiant barrier very simple. The main goal is to get the foil down first/before the battens (if applicable), then continue the installation via the normal process.

When you have an air gap under the tile (or created by the battens), this is what enables the foil to work as a radiant barrier, using REFLECTIVITY to reflect 97% of radiant heat coming in through the roof from passing through the foil and in to the area below the foil/the living space. Your result is a structure (home or a commercial building) that is significantly cooler inside and easier to keep cool on hot, sunny days. No other insulation product can offer you the same benefits as a radiant barrier!

Stucco%20lathe%20Aspen%20045IMG00144-20120609-1328For a curved tile (like Spanish clay tile) your installation layering looks like this (coming from the roof down toward the interior of the building):

  • Curved tiles
  • Air gap created by shape of the tile
  • RoofingFoil
  • Decking
  • Attic/Etc.

IMG_3721-1For a tile roof that uses a batten system, layering looks like this (coming from the roof down toward the interior of the building):

  • Tiles
  • Air space created by battens/furring strips
  • RoofingFoil
  • Decking
  • Attic/Etc.

20160404_123404See more Tile Roof Radiant Barrier Installation photos here.